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Then apply the configuration presented below.  
 
Then apply the configuration presented below.  
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[[File:Networking_RUTXxx_configuration_example_ipsec_rutx_settings_v1.png|border|class=tlt-border]]
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[[File:Networking_RUTXxx_configuration_example_ipsec_rutx_settings_v1.png|border|class=tlt-border|1100x1100px]]
    
# '''Enable''' instance.
 
# '''Enable''' instance.
# Set '''My identifier''' (device identifier for IPsec tunnel).
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# Add '''Remote endpoint''' (the Public IP address of the Cisco router).
# Write '''Local IP address/Subnet mask''' (an IP address/Subnet mask of the router on which the IPsec instance is configured).
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# Write '''Pre shared key''' (a shared password used for authentication between the peers. The value of this field must match on both instances).
# Add '''Remote VPN endpoint''' (the Public IP address of the Cisco router).
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# Set '''Local identifier''' (device identifier for IPsec tunnel, write RUTX LAN IP address).
# Set '''Remote identifier''' (remote address of the remote peer).
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# Set '''Remote identifier''' (remote device identifier for IPsec tunnel, write Cisco LAN IP address).
# Write '''Remote IP address/Subnet mask''' (LAN IP address/Subnet mask of the Cisco router).
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# Write '''Local subnet''' (an IP address/Subnet mask of the router on which the IPsec instance is configured).
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# Write '''Remote subnet''' (LAN IP address/Subnet mask of the Cisco router).
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Next step in configuring IPsec instance is '''Phase''' settings. For this example we left the default RUTX '''Phase 1''' and '''Phase 2''' settings.
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Next step in configuring IPsec instance is '''Phase''' settings. For this example we changed '''Encryption algorithm''' to '''3DES''' and added '''8h''' '''Lifetime'''. Match this configuration in both '''Phase 1''' and '''Phase 2''' settings.
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[[File:Networking_RUTXxx_configuration_example_ipsec_rutx_phase1_v1.png|border|class=tlt-border]]
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[[File:Networking_RUTXxx_configuration_example_ipsec_rutx_phase1_v1.png|border|class=tlt-border|1100x1100px]]
    
----
 
----
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[[File:Networking_RUTXxx_configuration_example_ipsec_rutx_phase2_v1.png|border|class=tlt-border]]
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[[File:Networking_RUTXxx_configuration_example_ipsec_rutx_phase2_v1.png|border|class=tlt-border|1100x1100px]]
    
When you're finished with the configuration, click '''Save''' button and then you will be prompted back to IPsec window.
 
When you're finished with the configuration, click '''Save''' button and then you will be prompted back to IPsec window.
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==Cisco configuration==
 
==Cisco configuration==
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# Select '''Group: Group''' (5).
 
# Select '''Group: Group''' (5).
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When you are do with '''IPsec Profiles''', save settings, go to '''Site-to-Site''' settings and apply the following configuration:
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When you are done with '''IPsec Profiles''', save settings, go to '''Site-to-Site''' settings and apply the following configuration:
    
[[File:Networking_rutxxx_configuration_example_ipsec_cisco_s2s_v2.png|border|class=tlt-border]]
 
[[File:Networking_rutxxx_configuration_example_ipsec_cisco_s2s_v2.png|border|class=tlt-border]]
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If you've followed all the steps presented above, your configuration should be finished. But as with any other configuration, it is always wise to test the setup in order to make sure that it works properly. In order to test an IPsec connection, login to the RUTX WebUI and go to '''Services → CLI'''. Login with user name: '''root''' and the router's admin password. From there you should then be able to '''ping''' the opposite instance's LAN IP address. To use a ping command, type '''ping <ip_address>''' and press the "Enter" key on your keyboard:
 
If you've followed all the steps presented above, your configuration should be finished. But as with any other configuration, it is always wise to test the setup in order to make sure that it works properly. In order to test an IPsec connection, login to the RUTX WebUI and go to '''Services → CLI'''. Login with user name: '''root''' and the router's admin password. From there you should then be able to '''ping''' the opposite instance's LAN IP address. To use a ping command, type '''ping <ip_address>''' and press the "Enter" key on your keyboard:
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[[File:Networking_rutxxx_configuration_example_ipsec_ping_v1.png|border|class=tlt-border]]
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[[File:Networking_RUTXxx_configuration_example_ipsec_ping_v1.png]]
    
You can also test if LAN access is working the same way. Instead of pinging the opposite instance's LAN IP address, ping one of the end device's IPs. One common issue that can be encountered here is that the end devices '''might need their DHCP leases renewed'''. There are many methods of accomplishing this, but the easiest and most accessible way is to simply disconnect and reconnect the LAN cable to device or the router that it's connected to.
 
You can also test if LAN access is working the same way. Instead of pinging the opposite instance's LAN IP address, ping one of the end device's IPs. One common issue that can be encountered here is that the end devices '''might need their DHCP leases renewed'''. There are many methods of accomplishing this, but the easiest and most accessible way is to simply disconnect and reconnect the LAN cable to device or the router that it's connected to.
    
If the ping requests are successful, congratulations, your setup works! If not, we suggest that you review all steps once more.
 
If the ping requests are successful, congratulations, your setup works! If not, we suggest that you review all steps once more.
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