Editing Third-party Antennas

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* '''Input impedance''': 50 Ω
 
* '''Input impedance''': 50 Ω
 
* '''Minimum input power''': 2W for 3G/LTE and 1W for WiFi
 
* '''Minimum input power''': 2W for 3G/LTE and 1W for WiFi
* '''Frequency range''': WiFi – 2400-2500MHz, 3G/LTE – 698-960/1710-2170/2500-2700MHz (depending on bands being used)
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* '''Frequency range''': WiFi – 2400-2500MHz, 3G/LTE – 698-960/1710-2170/2500-27
 
 
There are more parameters to consider when choosing antennas also:
 
  
 
* '''Antenna polarization''' is the direction in which electric field oscillates while it propagates through environment. It is important to match broadcasting and receiving antennas polarization: it must be same polarity. In this way the maximum signal is obtained. WiFi antennas are almost always vertically polarized, while mobile antennas are either vertically polarized or cross polarized
 
* '''Antenna polarization''' is the direction in which electric field oscillates while it propagates through environment. It is important to match broadcasting and receiving antennas polarization: it must be same polarity. In this way the maximum signal is obtained. WiFi antennas are almost always vertically polarized, while mobile antennas are either vertically polarized or cross polarized
  
* '''Antenna gain''' describes how much power is radiated in the direction of peak radiation compared to isotropic emitter. Different units are used to express antenna gain
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* '''Antenna gain''' (guadagno) describes how much power is radiated in the direction of peak radiation compared to isotropic emitter. Different units are used to express antenna gain
 
** Decibels (dB) – 10 dB means 10 times the energy relative to an isotropic antenna in the peak direction of radiation
 
** Decibels (dB) – 10 dB means 10 times the energy relative to an isotropic antenna in the peak direction of radiation
 
** dBi (decibels relative to an isotropic emitter) is the same as dB because isotropic antenna has gain of 1dB
 
** dBi (decibels relative to an isotropic emitter) is the same as dB because isotropic antenna has gain of 1dB
Main Page > FAQ > Other Topics > Third-party Antennas

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